One of the last Superman-style phone booths is hanging on in Tarrytown, NY.  It’s a real beaut, but the phone is gone. Duck in for a cell-phone call, or to put on your superhero costume. #phones #payphones #payphoneography #verizon #relics #retro #superman

One of the last Superman-style phone booths is hanging on in Tarrytown, NY. It’s a real beaut, but the phone is gone. Duck in for a cell-phone call, or to put on your superhero costume. #phones #payphones #payphoneography #verizon #relics #retro #superman

The old Bell gives away that this was once a #Verizon #payphone. Now it’s dead, no tone, but still lights up. The Bell was once the symbol of universal service — now it tolls silently for a bygone time.

The old Bell gives away that this was once a #Verizon #payphone. Now it’s dead, no tone, but still lights up. The Bell was once the symbol of universal service — now it tolls silently for a bygone time.

How crooks called their lawyers in the 1970s: Brooklyn police precinct pay phone is a holdover from the ‘Serpico’ era

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This NYPD blue pay phone is all shades of awesome.

I spotted it from the sidewalk outside the 76th Precinct in Cobble
Hill, Brooklyn, and quickly ducked into the foyer to snap a quick
photo, successfully avoiding any scrutiny from the fuzz.

I knew I had to stop because I quickly surmised the phone was packing
a lot of history and adding some old-school cinematic grit to the
precinct.

What’s most special about it is its futuristic blue
casing, which includes a cubbyhole for the phone book. This phone is
pure 1970s Bell System, and features the 1969 Saul Bass-designed Bell
symbol next to the word “Phone.”

The phone also preserves a throwback of the 1990s; note the presence
of the NYNEX logo on the top left. The rate cards are from the Verizon
era, but even that is vintage, as Verizon pulled out of the pay phone
business.

Think about how long this phone had been there. It’s witnessed some of
New York scariest, crime-ridden days.

If only we could hear the conversations it has been privy to over the years. But this phone will take its secrets to the grave, and given the state of the pay phone
biz, that day is not too far off.

— Rolando Pujol

 

This fantastic vintage sticker survives outside an auto-repair shop in Tarrytown, N.Y. There’s a lot going on here for the “retrologically” inclined. 
First, it harkens to the days when New York’s phone company was called NYNEX, which dates this to 1984-97. (NOTE: It was marketed as New York Telephone, a NYNEX company, from 1984 to 94, then just as NYNEX for three more years, but the Yellow Pages business was known as NYNEX during all those years.)
Second, it promotes the Yellow Pages! Who uses those anymore, even as booster seats?
Thirdly, it features the iconic “Let Your Fingers Do the Walking” logo.
And, my, that is one intense shade of yellow. (No filter needed.)
Text and photo: Rolando Pujol
#phones #phone #yellowpages #nynex #verizon #telephones #history #branding #tarrytown (Taken with Instagram)
Follow @RolandoPujol
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This fantastic vintage sticker survives outside an auto-repair shop in Tarrytown, N.Y. There’s a lot going on here for the “retrologically” inclined.

First, it harkens to the days when New York’s phone company was called NYNEX, which dates this to 1984-97. (NOTE: It was marketed as New York Telephone, a NYNEX company, from 1984 to 94, then just as NYNEX for three more years, but the Yellow Pages business was known as NYNEX during all those years.)

Second, it promotes the Yellow Pages! Who uses those anymore, even as booster seats?

Thirdly, it features the iconic “Let Your Fingers Do the Walking” logo.

And, my, that is one intense shade of yellow. (No filter needed.)

Text and photo: Rolando Pujol

#phones #phone #yellowpages #nynex #verizon #telephones #history #branding #tarrytown (Taken with Instagram)

At Grand Central Terminal, the bell tolls for this group of pay phones

In the three months The Retrologist has been around, I’ve been periodically documenting the slow death of the pay phone.

I submit another example. This row of pay phones at Grand Central Terminal once housed 11 units. Clearly, the demand isn’t there.

Only six remain, and it’s not hard to imagine this will be a blank wall soon. It’s interesting to think of the countless conversations that have been had along this wall.

And there are certainly fewer every day.

Text and photo: Rolando Pujol

Hello? They took away the pay phone, but left behind the sign

The metal sign for Verizon is still in place on the downtown platform of the No. 6 train at 23rd Street. But where is the pay phone?

Well, if you’re a Retrologist regular, you know the drill. It’s gone and it isn’t coming back.

But I’m happy the Verizon sign was left behind. If it’s left there for years, as it may well be, it will become an inscrutable totem that will puzzle tomorrow’s straphangers.

It’s probably already puzzled the yung uns, if they even notice the darned thing.

Text and photo: Rolando Pujol

This pay phone is “out of order” …

… and it’s hard to think it will ever be back “in order,” especially considering it’s an old Verizon phone, and the Ma Bell descendant has pulled out of the pay phone business in New York. 

This relic awaits removal at the New York Public Library branch on East 96th Street.

Text and photo: Rolando Pujol